Derrida: Profanations presents a re-appraisal of Jacques Derridas deconstruction. If philosophy articulates what it means to be human, then deconstruction, which Patrick OConnor argues consigns all existence to a mortal, profane and worldly life remains radically philosophical. The assertion demands an analysis of Derridas radicalisation of the key philosophers who influenced him, as well as a rebuttal of theological accounts of deconstruction. This book closely examines how the phenomenological lineage is received in deconstruction, especially the relation between deconstruction and Derridas radical readings of Hegel, Husserl, Levinas and Heidegger. This book presents a theorisation of deconstruction as profane, atheistic and egalitarian. It reveals how deconstruction holds the resources to think ontology as a multiplicity of worlds through demonstrates the ways in which Derrida expresses a phenomenology which disjoints humans orientation to the world. Deconstruction is characterized as radically hubristic. For deconstruction, nothing is sacred. If nothing sustains itself as separate, exclusive or sacrosanct, then nothing can sustain the implementation of its own hierarchy.

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