Entrepreneurship education at tertiary institutions ranks high on policy agendas in Europe and the US. The increase in resources allocated to this kind of education comes along with a growing demand for justifying these investments. A better understanding of the size and nature of entrepreneurship education effects is critical. Richard Weber addresses this question and analyzes the effects of a large-scale compulsory entrepreneurship course on students' entrepreneurial intentions by employing a quasi-experimental approach. Moreover, he highlights the role of social interactions among students in building entrepreneurial skills. The results yield important implications for public policy, sponsors and lecturers of entrepreneurship education.?

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