The 16th-Century intellectual Robert Recorde is chiefly remembered for introducing the equals sign into algebra, yet the greater significance and broader scope of his work is often overlooked. This book presents an authoritative and in-depth analysis of the man, his achievements and his historical importance. This scholarly yet accessible work examines the latest evidence on all aspects of Recordes life, throwing new light on a character deserving of greater recognition. Topics and features: presents a concise chronology of Recordes life; examines his published works; describes Recordes professional activities in the minting of money and the mining of silver, as well as his dispute with William Herbert, Earl of Pembroke; investigates Recordes work as a physician, his linguistic and antiquarian interests, and his religious beliefs; discusses the influence of Recordes publisher, Reyner Wolfe, in his life; reviews his legacy to 17th-Century science, and to modern computer science and mathematics.

Rezensionen ( 0 )
Noch keine Rezensionen vorhanden.
Sie können die Erörterung eröffnen.
Zitate (0)
Sie können als Erste ein Zitat veröffentlichen.