"Austrian philosopher LUDWIG WITTGENSTEIN (1889?1951) was hugely influential on 20th-century philosophy, and here, he constructs a series of carefully and precisely numbered propositions on the relationship between language, logic, and reality, using a numbering system to show nested relationships between the propositions. Considered one of the major recent works of philosophy?a reputation enhanced, undoubtedly, by Bertrand Russell?s glowing introduction?this edition is a reproduction of the translation by C.K. Ogden, first published in 1922, for which Wittgenstein himself assisted in the preparation of the English-language manuscript. Students of philosophy and those fascinated by the history of ideas will want a copy of this essential volume. "

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From the existence or non-existence of one state of affairs it is impossible to infer the existence or non-existence of another.
It is as impossible to represent in language anything that 'contradicts logic' as it is in geometry to represent by its coordinates a figure that contradicts the laws of space, or to give the coordinates of a point that does not exist.
3.331 From this observation we turn to Russell's 'theory of types'. It can be seen that Russell must be wrong, because he had to mention the meaning of signs when establishing the rules for them.
It used to be said that God could create anything except what would be contrary to the laws of logic. The truth is that we could not say what an 'illogical' world would look like.
A proposition is not a blend of words.(Just as a theme in music is not a blend of notes.) A proposition is articulate.
A proposition that mentions a complex will not be nonsensical, if the complex does not exits, but simply false.